Regulations

Drought Issues
We are experiencing a severe drought in our area, which causes the ground to shift and water lines to break. If your water pressure is low or you have no water, this could be the cause. We need your patience and understanding to help us make the necessary repairs to restore service to everyone. If you experience low water pressure or have questions, please call the Utilities Department during normal business hours at (210) 658-3453. If you experience no water after hours, please call the Police Department dispatch at (210) 658-2322.

Edwards Aquifer Authority Regulation
The Edwards Aquifer Authority, in an effort to delay the need for mandatory restrictions on pumping from the aquifer, is urging water users across the region to heighten conservation measures to help counter the effects of a continuing drought. Without measurable rainfall, authority officials project that Stage I of the region’s Critical Period Management (CPM) plan could be declared within weeks, based on the declining rate of springflow at the San Marcos springs.

Edwards Aquifer Authority Act Indicators
The San Marcos Springs are one of three indicators identified in the Edwards Aquifer Authority Act to gauge aquifer conditions and to trigger various stages of the Critical Period Management plan for the San Antonio Pool of the Edwards Aquifer region. Currently, the other two indicators - water level as measured at the J-17 Index Well in Bexar County and the rate of spring discharge at Comal Springs - have not yet dropped to critical period trigger levels. However, on Thursday, January 15, the 10-day average of the rate of springflow at the San Marcos Springs was 97.8 cubic feet per second (cfs), less than two cfs from the Stage I trigger point of 96 cfs.

Under Stage I regulation, municipal, industrial, and agriculture users must cut their pumping from the aquifer by 20%. Stage I for the San Antonio Pool applies to all Edwards Aquifer groundwater permit holders within Atascosa, Bexar, Caldwell, Comal, Guadalupe, and Medina counties. However, the authority believes voluntary conservation now could help delay the mandatory cutbacks.